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A good old west country dialect song this and remarkably clean except that it leads on to a much ruder one called "Be I Bristol" which in turn leads to a ruder "Rip my Knickers away". All three songs are always sung together as one.

Score of The Blackbird Song
Where be that blackbird too, I know where 'e be,
'E be up yon whortle tree and I be arter 'e,
Well 'e seed I and I seed 'e and 'e know'd I be arter 'e,
Wid a bloody gert stick I'll knock 'e down,
Blackbird, where are thee.
The fly. the fly, the fly be on the turnip,
Well 'e seed I and 'e know'd I,
Gonna knock 'e off that turnip.

Another version was provided by Vyv Brown:

Where be that blackbird too, I know where 'e be,
'E be up yon wurzle bush and I be arter 'e,
Well 'e likes I and I likes 'e, bugger I don't I like 'e,
If I 'ad a bloody gert stick,
Cor bugger I would't I swipe 'e.
The fly. the fly, the fly be on the turmut,
Tis only I though I do try,
To keep fly off the turmut.

Vyv then does not follow with 'Be I Bristol' but follows with:


Score of Flour and Lard Half a pound of flour and lard,
Makes a lovely batter.
Mix it 'til it's good and hard,
Cor bugger Jagger.
Oh how happy I shall be,
When I gets to the West Country,
Where all the oggies grow on trees,
Cor bugger Jagger.

Vyv explains that Jagger is a Devonian/Naval term for a Cornishman and Oggies are Cornish pasties.
There is a second verse:

Half a pound of gelegnite,
Makes a lovely banger.
Tamp it 'till it's good and tight,
cor bugger Jagger.
Press the tit and up she goes,
Where she's gone to no one knows,
Half the debris on my toes,
cor bugger Jagger.

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